Interactive Cases

In response to questions about her use of substances, Casey describes herself as a "social drinker. Who should be included in your work with Marcel, and why? She doesn't want to keep working there, and wants to be reassigned to someone else. Robbie had been partying at a friend's house and left about 1: Be sure that you have a concrete and specific strategy for how you would address alcohol issues with Steven. He has limited insight into his own behavior and how he has changed, so it is difficult for him to understand why his friends and family react to him differently now.

More research needs to be done on creative work and teamwork, but the evidence still suggests that with most jobs, a good rule of thumb is to let employees have one to two days a week at home.

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Use training materials to develop a list of options and an initial plan of action for social work intervention with Steven. Develop a strategy for social work practice with Steven. Be sure that you have a concrete and specific strategy for how you would address alcohol issues with Steven. Consider what kinds of reactions you might expect, and develop a plan for how to respond to them.

Discuss implications for community intervention, prevention planning, social policy reform, and advocacy that are associated with Steven's situation.

Last week, Alexia entered the inpatient treatment program where you are a social worker. She is being treated for alcohol and cocaine crack dependence.

Alexia is a year-old, divorced woman who is employed as an administrative assistant at a local human services program. She lives with her year-old daughter, Christine, in an apartment located near her job. Although she makes a relatively low salary, Alexia has managed to support herself and her daughter without financial support from Christine's father.

Alexia was married briefly to Christine's father when she was 20, but she left him after he became physically and sexually abusive toward her. He also was an alcoholic. She had almost no contact with him for many years. Her mother, a widow, is a strong support for Alexia and Christine, as are two cousins, Denise and Moira. Alexia reports growing up in a "normal middle class family" and states that her childhood was "good" despite her father's occasional drinking binges, which she says were related to him celebrating a special account he had landed he was in advertising , and her mother's "occasional bad depressions.

She had a sponsor and they kept in touch several times a week-more, if needed. From the beginning of recovery, Alexia has experienced some mild depression. She describes having little pleasure in life and feeling tired and "dragging" all of the time. Alexia reports that her difficulty in standing up for herself with her boss at work is a constant stressor.

After Alexia had been sober for about 3 months, an older boy sexually assaulted Christine after school. Alexia supported Christine through the prosecution process; the case was tried in juvenile court and the boy returned to school 2 months later.

After Alexia celebrated her 6-month sobriety anniversary, she reports that she started having a harder time getting herself up each day. Around this same time, she returned to drinking daily.

She says that she then started experiencing bouts of feeling worthless, sad, guilty, hopeless, and very anxious. Her sleep problems increased, she began having nightmares, and she lost her appetite.

She started her crack use again one night after her boss got very upset with her not finishing something on time. She went to a local bar after work that day and hooked up with a guy she met there to get crack.

In accompanying him to a local dealer's house to get some crack, she was raped by several men. Alexia did not return home that night Christine was at a friend's sleepover party and did not show up for work the next day.

She does not recall where she was the rest of that night. However, later that day she admitted herself to your treatment program. Alexia reports that she began drinking regularly several times a week around the age of She recalls having felt depressed around the same time that she began drinking heavily, although she states she has very few clear memories of that time in her life. Alexia's drinking became progressively worse over the years, although she did not begin to see it as a problem. She reports feeling depressed over much of her adult life, however her depression got much worse after she began using crack daily.

Alexia reports having had a lot of gynecological problems during her 20s, resulting in a hysterectomy at age When asked if she was ever physically or sexually abused as a child, she says no; however, she confesses with some difficulty that when she was 11, she had an affair with her year-old uncle father's brother-in-law.

Now, one week into treatment, Alexia reports feeling numb and tense. She talks only in women's treatment groups and, then, only when specifically asked a question. She feels hopeless about her ability to put her life together and says that she only sees herself failing again to achieve sobriety.

Of her recent rape, she says that she "only got what she deserved" for being in the wrong place with the wrong people at the wrong time. Alexia reflects that she was unable to adequately protect her daughter from sexual assault, and she speculates that maybe she is an unfit mother and should give up custody of her daughter. While Christine is currently staying with Alexia's mother, Alexia is concerned that her ex-husband will try to get custody of Christine if he hears that she is in the hospital for alcohol and drug treatment.

He has been in recovery himself for two years and began demanding to see Christine again about 2 months ago. Identify and sort through the relevant facts presented by Alexia. Identify the problems, issues, and concerns that arise with Alexia's situation. What are the most pressing issues that Alexia should be encouraged to assess and address? Identify the positive and strengths aspects of Alexia's situation. Use training materials to develop a list of options and an initial plan of action for social work intervention with Alexia.

Who should be involved in the intervention for Alexia? Who should also be referred for intervention? Develop a strategy for social work practice with Alexia. Be sure that you have a concrete and specific strategy for how you would address alcohol issues. Following inpatient treatment, what kinds of referrals in your practice community would you make and why? Discuss implications for community intervention, prevention planning, social policy reform, and advocacy that are associated with Alexia's situation.

Jaclyn is 23 years old and is four months pregnant. She is visiting a comprehensive "wrap around services" health clinic for prenatal care for the first time.

The medical team advises prenatal nutritional counseling and vitamins, and assesses her pregnancy as "progressing normally" at this stage. However, she has been referred to you because in the health assessment she responded that she has "always" consumed one or two drinks, almost every day, when she comes home from work to unwind from the stress of her job. There are also social events on weeknights and weekends with family and friends that typically involve light to moderate drinking.

Identify and sort through the relevant facts presented by Jaclyn's situation. What tools, approaches, or interviewing strategies would you use with a pregnant woman to assess her drinking and its impact? What other issues should be assessed, as well? Identify the problems, issues, and concerns that arise with Jaclyn's situation. What information should you be certain is shared with Jaclyn? Identify the positive and strengths aspects of Jaclyn's situation.

Use training materials to develop a list of options and an initial plan of action for social work intervention with Jaclyn. Who should be involved in the intervention for Jaclyn? Develop a strategy for social work practice with Jaclyn. Be sure that you have a concrete and specific strategy for how you would address alcohol issues with Jaclyn.

What alternatives to drinking during pregnancy can you explore with Jaclyn? Discuss implications for community intervention, prevention planning, social policy reform, and advocacy that are associated with Jaclyn's situation. Robert is a year-old businessman who was involved in a car accident on his way home after having a couple of drinks at the local bar. He was referred for evaluation and treatment because at the time of the accident, his blood alcohol test showed.

He is overweight and tends to have high blood pressure. He grew up in the neighborhood where he and his wife now live. They have two children, ages 6 and 4 years. Robert has several childhood friends who come to the bar, almost every day during the week, to have drinks and socialize.

His father is also a frequent visitor to the bar, and has been for the past 40 years. Robert's father drinks 4 to 5 drinks when he is at the bar, but he does not seem to have any significant problems related to drinking, except for his hypertension. Robert drinks 3 to 5 beers at the bar, but he does not feel that he has any drinking problems because he does not drink at home except for wine with his evening meal.

Identify and sort through the relevant facts presented by Robert's situation. What tools or interviewing strategies would you use to assess his drinking and its impact? What do you assess his drinking risk to be? Identify the problems, issues, and concerns that arise with Robert's situation. What information should you be certain is shared with Robert? What is your advice to Robert concerning his drinking? Identify the positive and strengths aspects of Robert's situation.

Use training materials to develop a list of options and an initial plan of action for social work intervention with Robert. Who should be involved in the intervention for Robert? Develop a strategy for social work practice with Robert. Be sure that you have a concrete and specific strategy for how you would address alcohol issues with Robert. What alternatives to drinking can you explore with Robert? Discuss implications for community intervention, prevention planning, social policy reform, and advocacy that are associated with Robert's situation.

Cook is a year-old African American woman who voluntarily approached your primary provider agencies for substance abuse treatment services. She has been charged four times with disorderly conduct, once for fishing without a license, and twice for driving without a license she never applied for one. She is currently awaiting trial for battery. Cook has been incarcerated twice during her adulthood once for 10 months and, most recently, for 10 days. The results of an AUDIT screening suggested that she was binge drinking weekly during the past year.

Screening for co-occurring problems using the MPSI-A indicated potential depression and other psychological distress. Cook was currently living with her grandmother, who had raised her.

She is the mother of four children ages 11, 7, 4, 2 years-she was 17 at the birth of her first child. The older two sons are living in foster care.

The younger two daughters have complex health problems and developmental delays; they live with another relative. She is no longer in contact with any of the children's fathers three men , and was only briefly married to the second man. She has no close friends and a distant, conflicted relationship with family members other than the grandmother with whom she has almost always lived.

She has great difficulty in "getting along" with people. She was physically abused as a child, which prompted her move to the grandmother's home. Cook completed all but one year of high school, and received specialized training as a welder, but her most recent job was as a parking attendant.

Her longest period of continuous employment was just over one year, and she has worked irregularly throughout her adult life. She describes her present health as "good" and she has a history of depression, anxiety, hallucinations, cognitive and memory deficits, and violent behavior. She has never received psychiatric care. Cook identified her primary problem as alcohol use, along with regular marijuana smoking and eating.

She began drinking at age 14 and using marijuana at age 17; she began using crack cocaine from the time she was She has been detoxed on three separate occasions. The longest that she has gone without using any substances was 60 days; she resumed using approximately two months ago. Cook reported that she was extremely troubled and concerned about her substance use and that seeking treatment is very important to her. Identify and sort through the relevant facts presented by Ms. Identify the problems, issues, and concerns that arise with Ms.

What are the most pressing issues that Ms. Cook should be encouraged to address? Identify the positive and strengths aspects of Ms. Use training materials to develop a list of options and an initial plan of action for social work intervention with Ms.

Develop a strategy for social work practice with Ms. Be sure that you have a concrete and specific strategy for how you would address issues with Ms. How should the service plan be developed and implemented? What are the various service components with which Ms. How will they be coordinated? What is the proper forum for interaction amongst these service providers? Who should be involved? What services are needed but not being received? How will they be obtained? What are the appropriate roles of each service component?

Who should be responsible for monitoring the service plan? Discuss implications for community intervention, prevention planning, social policy reform, and advocacy that are associated with Ms. How would the situation be different if Ms. Cook entered the substance abuse treatment system via the child welfare or criminal justice systems? His attorney has suggested that he quit drinking and enter treatment, at least until his trial which is scheduled in two months.

Dave does not anticipate serving jail time, but he believes that treatment could strengthen his legal case. After his first arrest for DUI two years ago, he simply paid a fine and attended a special driver's education program for six weeks.

Dave found the program to be "a waste of time. He has had numerous arguments with his wife, Melanie, concerning his drinking. He gets very angry and defensive when she confronts him about his heavy drinking, and asserts that he is not an alcoholic. He knows this is true because his father was an alcoholic and Dave says that he is not like his father.

His father died as the result of a fight that occurred in traffic when he was drunk. Dave says that his father used to "beat the tar out" of him and his brother when he was drunk, and that his father always belittled, taunted, and threatened their mother, whether he was drunk or sober. Dave's work history is very good; he misses less than one day per year.

He works the day shift on weekdays, putting in time-and-a-half overtime on most Saturdays. He is well regarded by his supervisors and peers at work. He is fearful that his employer will find out about his treatment it is being covered by his HMO , and that people at work will learn about the second DUI arrest.

Dave drinks with his buddies from the plant, and does not think that his drinking is any more than what they do. He was just "unlucky" and got caught doing what everyone else seems to get away with. Dave's drinking is very predictable: Several of these are consumed at the bar with friends, the remainder at home over the course of the evening.

He usually falls asleep in front of the television. On weekends, he often drinks twelve packs between Friday and Sunday. A typical Saturday involves getting up at This pattern leads to arguments with Melanie, who calls him a "lousy father. He has commented to friends that "maybe I overdo it a bit. He once attended a few AA meetings, but did not feel that it was helpful: Despite these attempts, Dave has experienced increased consumption levels over the past two years.

He admits that, as a result of the drinking, he has become increasingly estranged from his wife and sons. Dave feels that his marriage has been basically good, but that he would not blame Melanie for leaving him, the way things have been going lately. She will no longer "sleep" with him while he is intoxicated, which occurs regularly. She complains that the house is "falling apart" because Dave does not keep up with his chores.

He believes that his marriage would become solid again, if he stopped over doing the drinking. But, he complains about her hassling him about the alcohol. Dave is not close to his remaining family members. His mother is very religious and wishes Dave would see religion as a way out of his problems.

His siblings live in other communities and they rarely get together. His wife and sons regularly attend his mother's church, but Dave only attends on Christmas Eve and Easter Sunday. Dave is distraught about having to remain abstinent in preparation for the trial.

He has trouble getting to sleep without alcohol. He also "gets jumpy" when he tries to stay away from drinking, feeling "closed in" or "like he is suffocating. Identify and sort through the relevant facts presented by Dave's situation. Identify the problems, issues, and concerns that arise with Dave's situation. What information should you be certain is shared with Dave?

What is your advice to Dave concerning his drinking? How would you assess motivational issues prior to and during the course of intervention with Dave? Identify the positive and strengths aspects of Dave's situation. Use training materials to develop a list of options and an initial plan of action for social work intervention with Dave. What are reasonable outcomes to be expected with Dave?

Who should be involved in the intervention for Dave? Develop a strategy for social work practice with Dave. What measures and procedures would you employ to formulate and negotiate goals with Dave?

How would you apply motivational, cognitive behavioral, and relationship therapy approaches with Dave? Discuss implications for community intervention, prevention planning, social policy reform, and advocacy that are associated with Dave's situation.

What elements would be different in this case if Dave were, instead: Sal Franco is a year old man, living alone in an apartment complex for older adults. You are the Senior Services social worker associated with the housing units.

Sal and his wife, Maria, owned and operated a small, local grocery for 44 years they emigrated from Italy when they were newlyweds at age They sold the business to their son Dominic when Sal turned The plan was to enjoy travel and retired life together. However, shortly after retiring, Maria was diagnosed with an aggressive leukemia, and she died within 4 months. Franco has been living alone for over 3 years. Because Sal and Maria spent most of their time working and involved with family activities, there are few close friends in his life.

Dominic's family has Sal to dinner every Sunday, but has little time during the week because of competing demands. Sal's other children include a daughter living in another state who calls daily but seldom visits because of the cost , a daughter oversees in military service, and a son with Down's Syndrome who lives in a group home about an hour away.

Sal indicates that he was a "hard drinker" during his 20s and 30s, when he developed stomach problems and high blood pressure. At that point, he limited his use of alcohol to his Friday night poker club and to Sunday dinner with the family. Since Maria's death, Sal has regularly consumed 3 to 4 drinks a day. He says it alleviates some of the pain, stress, and loneliness. It also helps him sleep, along with the over-the-counter medications that he takes for arthritis pain and as sleep aides.

He came to the clinic because his hypertension and gastritis have become extremely labile and intractable. When you ask Mr. Franco how he is doing, he says, "Oh, I guess I'm okay for an old widower. I don't think it really matters how I feel or what I do anymore at my age.

Identify and sort through the relevant facts presented by Sal Franco's situation. What tools would you use to assess his drinking and its impact? Identify the problems, issues, and concerns that arise with Sal's situation. What information should you be certain is shared with Sal? What is your advice to Sal concerning his drinking? What other assessments need to be conducted? Identify the positive and strengths aspects of Sal's situation.

Use training materials to develop a list of options and an initial plan of action for social work intervention with Sal. Who should be involved in the intervention for Sal? Develop a strategy for social work practice with Mr. Be sure that you have a concrete and specific strategy for how you would address alcohol issues with him. We will provide you with a password to use to log in. You have been sent in email with your username and password, as a reminder.

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Mar 03,  · Proponents of telecommuting, however, point to numerous studies showing that people who work from home are on average more productive than other workers and . Both home- and office-based employees worked the same shift period, in their same work groups, under the same managers as before, and logged on to the same computer system, with the same equipment. Review case studies to see the positive impact family care benefits have on industry leaders.




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Instruction Through Teaching Case Examples. These materials provide opportunities to develop and enhance application skills. TIPS FOR FACILITATING CASE LEARNING (adapted from McWilliam, ) almost every day, when she comes home from work to unwind from the stress of her job. There are also social events on weeknights and weekends with. Interactive Cases Select one of the six cases below to begin. Students and instructors have full access to each case without logging in, but by creating an account you can save your notes. But a recent study conducted by a couple of Stanford researchers found letting employees work from home made them happier, less likely to quit, and more productive.




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